Karna’s innuendo

Karna was bent upon indulging in further provocation of the Pandavas.

“Among the beautiful women in the world,” he said with his tongue in the cheek, “I have not seen one like Draupadi. When the Pandavas and the sons of Dhrutharashtra were overcome by anger and got excited, it fell to Draupadi’s lot to bring peace to the Pandavas. When the Pandavas were sinking in an ocean of sorrow, this Panchali rescued them with a kind of boat and pulled them out of difficulty.”

Karna’s provocative words in the presence of Kuru kings made Bhimasena very unhappy. His impatience knew no bounds. Breathing heavily, he said to Arjuna:

“Dhananjaya!” he bemoaned, “Aho! Streegatihi Paanduputraanaam. Alas! For the brave sons of Pandu, a woman has become the deliverer!”

“The great ones say that there are three indicators of light innate in the human being, namely, issues, karma and education. Even the world is born of these three. When man is bereft of life, his body becomes impure and even his relatives and friends spurn, burn or bury the body. Even at that grave moment, the three lights will be instrumental in taking the departed soul to the world of Pitrus or Heaven. However, these three are dim and hazy today. For, on account of Draupadi’s distress caused by Dusshaasana’s force in order to drag, denude and shame her, the light which indicates the issues is lost. Dhananjaya! Having been touched by a strange man, how can her issues merit the description of those of a low profile? Whoever does not feel shy to touch someone’s consort is to be called a debaucherous one. For such one, there is no divine light called “Apatyam”. He cannot have any such lights.

“Brother!” said Arjuna pacifying Bheema, “There is no point in giving importance to the words of low class people. It is the habit of wicked people to indulge in harsh words and it is therefore useless to react to their expression. Men of integrity do not respond to uncharitable or vehement ones. The righteous ones installed in self-respect, get on with their rightful actions regardless of the wrongful deeds of enemies.”

Bheema, excited as he was, did not appear to take kindly to Arjuna’s pacificatory advice. Grinding his teeth in disapprobation, he said to Yudhishtira:

“Maharaja! Tell me quickly. In this very assembly hall, I shall kill all the enemies present here in a trice. Or, I shall pull them out of this place and put an end to their life, leaving none.”

There was no response from Dharmaraja. Bheema’s anger ran high. His protestation was loud:

“…Or what is the use of this dispute to us? What is also the use of exercising patience in mere words? Why should I sit here waiting for your approval? At this very moment, I shall end the life chapter of all these people. Then you rule this vast earthly empire free from cantankerous cousins.” Bheema’s eyes were red like a lion’s, with the approaching animals as prey. The blood-shot ones surveyed the unresponsive kings.

Perceiving the danger likely to be unleashed, Arjuna was seen to pacify Bheema frequently. Bheema was a fiery image of Yama of the devastating time of deluge of the world. None dared to look at his face that was spitting fire.

In the end, Dharmaraja himself got up and went into Bheema and embracing him, said  “Bhimasena! We should not do like that. Have patience and resume your seat.”

Dissuading Bheema from embarking on a punitive expedition, Yudhishtira proceeded to his uncle Dhrutharashtra and said to him with folded hands:

“Maharaja! You are our lord. Please direct us as to what we should do now. We would like to follow your command always.”

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